State of Montana Archives: on Education


Mike Cooney: Freeze college tuition; reduce student debt

Q: Support free or subsidized tuition for lower income individuals?

Cooney: Yes. Would freeze college tuition at four-year colleges and raise funding for two-year institutions. Supports federal funding for programs supporting low-income students. Would reduce student debt.

Gianforte: No. Sees "market forces," a decrease in the availability of student loans, as helping to lower cost of tuition. Focuses on promoting "trades education and apprenticeship programs" over four-year college degrees.

Source: CampusElect survey on 2020 Montana Gubernatorial race Nov 3, 2020

Betsy DeVos: States can fund private schools but not parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

It was a decision long sought by proponents of school choice and vehemently opposed by teachers' unions, who fear it could drain needed tax dollars from struggling public schools. The Montana supreme court struck down the program, citing the separation of church and state and prompting state officials to deny funds to secular schools as well. Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment

The Trump administration had sided with the parents. President Donald Trump has long championed prayer in schools, and January's oral argument in the case was attended by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, a longtime proponent of religious schools.

Source: USA Today on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Brett Kavanaugh: States funding private schools must fund parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The court stopped short of requiring states to fund religious education, ruling only that programs cannot differentiate between religious and secular private schools. "A state need not subsidize private education. But once a state decides to do so, it cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious," Roberts wrote.

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds. Amendments in 37 states were "'born of bigotry' and 'arose at a time of pervasive hostility to the Catholic Church,'" he wrote. "Many of its state counterparts have a similarly 'shameful pedigree.'"

Source: USA Today: Concurrence on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Clarence Thomas: States funding private schools must fund parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The court stopped short of requiring states to fund religious education, ruling only that programs cannot differentiate between religious and secular private schools. "A state need not subsidize private education. But once a state decides to do so, it cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious," Roberts wrote.

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds. Amendments in 37 states were "'born of bigotry' and 'arose at a time of pervasive hostility to the Catholic Church,'" he wrote. "Many of its state counterparts have a similarly 'shameful pedigree.'"

Source: USA Today: Concurrence on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Elena Kagan: States can fund private schools but not parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The Montana supreme court struck down the program, citing the separation of church and state and prompting state officials to deny funds to secular schools as well. The Supreme Court's liberal justices seized on that point in three separate dissents. They said Montana solved the discrimination by ending the program. "Petitioners may still send their children to a religious school," Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said. "There simply are no scholarship funds to be had."

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in constitutional amendments in 37 states, many rooted in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds.

Source: USA Today: Dissent on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

John Roberts: States funding private schools must fund parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The court stopped short of requiring states to fund religious education, ruling only that programs cannot differentiate between religious and secular private schools. "A state need not subsidize private education. But once a state decides to do so, it cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious," Roberts wrote.

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds. Amendments in 37 states were "'born of bigotry' and 'arose at a time of pervasive hostility to the Catholic Church,'" he wrote. "Many of its state counterparts have a similarly 'shameful pedigree.'"

Source: USA Today on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Neil Gorsuch: States funding private schools must fund parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The court stopped short of requiring states to fund religious education, ruling only that programs cannot differentiate between religious and secular private schools. "A state need not subsidize private education. But once a state decides to do so, it cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious," Roberts wrote.

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds. Amendments in 37 states were "'born of bigotry' and 'arose at a time of pervasive hostility to the Catholic Church,'" he wrote. "Many of its state counterparts have a similarly 'shameful pedigree.'"

Source: USA Today: Concurrence on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: States can fund private schools but not parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The Montana supreme court struck down the program, citing the separation of church and state and prompting state officials to deny funds to secular schools as well. The Supreme Court's liberal justices seized on that point in three separate dissents. They said Montana solved the discrimination by ending the program. "Petitioners may still send their children to a religious school," Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said. "There simply are no scholarship funds to be had."

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in constitutional amendments in 37 states, many rooted in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds.

Source: USA Today: Dissent on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Samuel Alito: States funding private schools must fund parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The court stopped short of requiring states to fund religious education, ruling only that programs cannot differentiate between religious and secular private schools. "A state need not subsidize private education. But once a state decides to do so, it cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious," Roberts wrote.

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds. Amendments in 37 states were "'born of bigotry' and 'arose at a time of pervasive hostility to the Catholic Church,'" he wrote. "Many of its state counterparts have a similarly 'shameful pedigree.'"

Source: USA Today: Concurrence on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Sonia Sotomayor: States can fund private schools but not parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The Montana supreme court struck down the program, citing the separation of church and state and prompting state officials to deny funds to secular schools as well. The Supreme Court's liberal justices seized on that point in three separate dissents. They said Montana solved the discrimination by ending the program. "Petitioners may still send their children to a religious school," Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said. "There simply are no scholarship funds to be had."

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in constitutional amendments in 37 states, many rooted in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds.

Source: USA Today: Dissent on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Stephen Breyer: States can fund private schools but not parochial schools

Supreme Court delivered a major victory to parents seeking state aid for their children's religious school education. The court's conservative majority ruled 5-4 that states offering scholarships to students in private schools cannot exclude religious schools from such programs.

The Montana supreme court struck down the program, citing the separation of church and state and prompting state officials to deny funds to secular schools as well. The Supreme Court's liberal justices seized on that point in three separate dissents. They said Montana solved the discrimination by ending the program. "Petitioners may still send their children to a religious school," Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said. "There simply are no scholarship funds to be had."

Roberts and other conservative justices said the no-aid policy had its roots in constitutional amendments in 37 states, many rooted in 19th-century anti-Catholic sentiment, that blocked religious schools from receiving public funds.

Source: USA Today: Dissent on Espinosa v. Montana, No. 18-1195 Jun 30, 2020

Steve Bullock: No tax credits for religious schools

The U.S. Supreme Court said Montana cannot exclude students at private, religious schools from using scholarship programs funded indirectly by a state income-tax credit. The ruling overturns a 2018 Montana Supreme Court order that terminated the tax credit and said the program violated Montana's constitutional ban on public aid to churches or religion-affiliated organizations. Bullock said he is "disappointed" with the decision and "will continue to fight for public education in Montana."
Source: KTVH NBC-TV-Helena on 2020 Montana Senate race Jun 30, 2020

Wilmot Collins: Child's education should be determined by where they grew up

We need to make big investments in our education system and that includes helping rural areas and states provide a quality education to our students today. It includes helping to raise pay for teachers willing to teach in rural areas, it includes having budgets that are healthy enough so that teachers do not have to buy supplies out of their own pockets, and it includes ensuring that the quality of a child's education is not determined by where they grew up.
Source: 2020 Montana Senate campaign website WilmotCollins.com Jun 4, 2020

Mike Cooney: Oppose diverting public funding toward private education

He is a champion of Montana's public education system and seeks ways to support educators and increase funding. As Governor, Mike will work with partner organizations to secure a public, voluntary, quality pre-K program across the state, ensure the 6-mill levy that funds our universities becomes permanent, and increase investments in two-year colleges, apprenticeship programs, and vocational education opportunities. He will oppose any efforts to divert public funding toward private education.
Source: 2020 Montana governor campaign website CooneyForMontana.com Mar 25, 2020

Whitney Williams: Prioritize affordable childcare and preschool

Williams was less critical of what she said in the first forum were shortcomings of the Bullock administration. While Williams discussed those issues, such as budget cuts in 2017 or a lack of a statewide preschool program, she didn't characterize them so much as Bullock's failings but problems for the state to solve. Williams said affordable childcare and preschool is an issue for families across the state, and that the next administration needs to prioritize it.
Source: Helena Independent-Record on 2020 Montana governor debate Feb 22, 2020

Whitney Williams: Opposes efforts to fund private schools with tax dollars

Williams said "Montana remains what America started out to be, a place of family farms and clean rivers, and of main street businesses working to meet the promises of the American Dream." But she said public lands are in jeopardy, prescription drug prices are, "frankly, immoral" and there were efforts to use public tax dollars to fund private schools.
Source: Great Falls Tribune on 2020 Montana gubernatorial race Feb 12, 2020

Reilly Neill: Support public education across the state

Neill is a former Democratic member of the Montana House of Representatives, representing District 62 from 2013-15.

Q: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

A: Making sure people on both sides of the aisle are treated fairly is important to me. I believe equality is the foundation of our democratic system. I want to work for a strong, sustainable economy in Montana, support public education across the state, and honor & respect treaties & compacts with tribal peoples.

Source: Ballotpedia.org on Montana legislative voting record Jan 30, 2020

Casey Schreiner: For public preschool, better funding for public schools

Montana kids are successful when they have access to a good education. No matter where you come from or where you live, your kids should have access to quality education. As a former teacher, Casey knows firsthand the huge impact our teachers have on our children. Casey is on the frontlines advocating for public preschool, and he'll always fight for better funding for Montana's public schools.
Source: 2020 Montana governor campaign website CaseyForMontana.com Dec 31, 2019

Casey Schreiner: Sees need for special needs funding as teacher and as parent

Schreiner said, "I am a special needs dad myself, I have two kids on the autism spectrum, and I'm in a unique position to be somebody who has been a teacher, but now I get to sit on the other side of the table as a parent. We need better funding. The state needs to prioritize that in their funding."

"It's harder to get across the finish line because that is actually increasing the budget (when) it should've been there from the beginning, so that's one place we are going to focus on."

Source: Havre Daily News on 2020 Montana gubernatorial race Dec 17, 2019

Steve Bullock: Freeze college tuition; college credit for veterans

For our veterans, we've expanded opportunities to get college credit for prior learning gained through their military service. In 2013, states around the country were slashing university budgets and saddling students with steep tuition increases. Instead, we have increased investments in higher education while freezing college tuition four of the last six years; leading to Montana having the fourth lowest tuition and fees in the nation. Let's once again freeze in-state college tuition and prevent what is effectively a tax increase on 28,000 Montana students and their families. And let's finally join 49 other states providing state-funded, need-based financial aid for students and adult learners. These investments will determine for decades to come the economic success of Montana students, workers and families.
Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Montana legislature Jan 31, 2019

Steve Bullock: 1-2-Free: High school dual enrollment to college

Public education is one of our state's great equalizers. I launched the "1-2-Free" Dual Enrollment Program so that high school students can take their first two college classes without paying a single penny in tuition. In 2013, not a single one of our two-year or tribal colleges was offering apprenticeships. We now have apprenticeship coursework in seven out of ten two-year colleges, and in five of seven tribal colleges.
Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Montana legislature Jan 31, 2019

Jon Tester: Privatizing public schools feeds destruction of democracy

Q: Education: Provide vouchers to send children to private schools with public money?

Matt Rosendale (R): Yes. "Critical.if we are going to see improvement in our education system."

Jon Tester (D): No. Privatization of public schools feeds destruction of democracy.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Montana Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Jon Tester: Restore year-round Pell Grants, & support Perkins Loans

Q: Student Debt & Financial Aid: Lower student loan rates, while increasing high-earner taxes (Elizabeth Warren bill)?

Matt Rosendale (R): No. "Move the federal government out of the funding that takes place for the colleges & universities."

Jon Tester (D): Yes. Voted for Warren bill. Also supports restoring year-round Pell Grants, & supporting Perkins Loans.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Montana Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Matt Rosendale: Government out of college funding

Q: Student Debt & Financial Aid: Lower student loan rates, while increasing high-earner taxes (Elizabeth Warren bill)?

Matt Rosendale (R): No. "Move the federal government out of the funding that takes place for the colleges & universities."

Jon Tester (D): Yes. Voted for Warren bill. Also supports restoring year-round Pell Grants, & supporting Perkins Loans.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Montana Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Matt Rosendale: Privatization is critical to improve our education system

Q: Education: Provide vouchers to send children to private schools with public money?

Matt Rosendale (R): Yes. "Critical.if we are going to see improvement in our education system."

Jon Tester (D): No. Privatization of public schools feeds destruction of democracy.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Montana Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Steve Bullock: Increase funding for higher education

We have much to be pleased with when it comes to our wise investments in higher education.
Source: 2017 State of the State address to Montana Legislature Jan 24, 2017

Steve Bullock: Invest in publicly funded early childhood education

It's time to follow the lead of 45 other states that have done it already, and invest in publicly funded early childhood education. My administration and local districts have made progress for our four-year olds these past four years, in spite of--not as a result of--this body. Last year, more than 650 children were able to access high quality preschool their parents otherwise might not have been able to afford.

The average cost of childcare in Montana for a four-year old is $7,900 dollars--in other words, more than college tuition at Montana State University or the University of Montana. A mom earning minimum wage could easily spend half of her income on childcare for just one kiddo.

Let's help those families. I have proposed a $12 million preschool grant program to allow school districts, Head Start programs or high-quality private preschool providers to offer preschool for four-year-old kids at or below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level.

Source: 2017 State of the State address to Montana Legislature Jan 24, 2017

Greg Gianforte: Provides high school scholarships for computer coding

Greg is the founder of CodeMontana, which provides public school scholarships to high school students to learn coding and computer science. He's also the founder of ACE Scholarships Montana to help low and moderate income students attend the school of their choice. Additionally, Greg launched Gianforte manufacturing scholarships, providing 50% scholarships to low-income Montanans and veterans.
Source: 2016 Montana governor's campaign website GregForMontana.com Feb 3, 2016

Greg Gianforte: Supports school choice and voucher initiatives

In addition to supporting school choice and voucher initiatives that have faced stiff opposition from Democrats in the Legislature, Gianforte proposed investing in additional science and math training for K-12 teachers and an expansion of the state's Digital Academy so more kids could pursue advanced coursework. As one way to bring more computer science courses to schools, he proposed making them an alternative to fulfill foreign language credit requirements.
Source: Billings Gazette on 2016 Montana gubernatorial race Jan 24, 2016

Greg Gianforte: Helped build a museum based on creationist beliefs

Montana has attracted a small but vocal hard-right Christian coalition, which is where Gianforte, a devout Christian who grew up in Philadelphia, fits in. The Gianforte Family Foundation has supported anti-abortion campaigns and helped build a museum based on the creationist belief that humans and dinosaurs coexisted. In 2014, Gianforte lobbied against a nondiscrimination ordinance in Bozeman.
Source: Ozy.com on 2016 Montana gubernatorial race Jan 13, 2016

Brad Johnson: Supports school choice

Johnson called himself a "proven vote-getter" with strong conservative positions, such as opposition to abortion, support of gun rights, support of "school choice" and opposition to expanded government, such as Medicaid coverage for poor people.
Source: KRTV.com on 2016 Montana gubernatorial race Sep 23, 2015

Mark Perea: Allot vouchers based on what we spend now per child

Perea, who has no children, is an advocate of school choice vouchers. "I want parents to have the choice of how they educate their kids," he said. "What I think would be perfectly equitable is each individual child having an allotment based on what we spend on each child now in public schools."
Source: Bozeman Daily Chronicle on 2016 Montana gubernatorial race Feb 1, 2015

Ryan Zinke: Give parents a stronger voice, and local control

I firmly believe that in order to reform education policies, we must ensure more local control of our schools and giving parents a stronger voice. Parents strive to provide the very best for their children, as such they deserve the opportunity to seek great teachers and schools that will help to prepare students for tomorrow's job market. Furthermore I strongly support innovation through the use of classroom technology, performance based curriculum, and quality instruction.
Source: 2014 Montana House campaign website, RyanZinke.com Nov 4, 2014

Steve Daines: Expand school choice where public schools are poor

Education is the lifeblood of our future. As a graduate of Montana State University, and parent of four children who have attended Bozeman public schools, I know firsthand how Montana educators go the extra mile to create an education environment conducive to learning.

The federal government plays a limited but important role in education, especially in helping states and local governments serve disadvantaged students and those with disabilities. As I meet with educators in Montana, they seem to share a concern about "one size fits all" metrics that currently dictate federal funding as part of No Child Left Behind. While well-intended, these metrics are difficult for rural areas to achieve. As Congress works to strengthen No Child Left Behind, I will fight to ensure that all of Montana's education needs are met. As part of this effort, I will push for expanding school choice so that more parents can send their children to a high-performing school where public schools are poor.

Source: 2014 Montana Senate campaign website, daines.house.gov Sep 1, 2014

Amanda Curtis: Math teacher and unabashed backer of public schools

Curtis, a 34-year-old math teacher at Butte High School, an unabashed backer of labor unions, public education and the "working class," is seemingly fired up at the chance to take on Steve Daines, the freshman Republican congressman who has had front-runner status for months in the Senate race.
Source: Billings Gazette on 2014 Montana Senate race Aug 16, 2014

Steve Bullock: Invest in higher ed for 21st Century workforce, like Diesel

We can't expect to develop a 21st Century workforce in 20th Century conditions. The next generation of plumbers and welders, nurses and imaging techs, diesel mechanics and carpenters are learning their trades in substandard facilities.

The Missoula College was built in 1956 for 700 students and now has an enrollment approaching 3,000. Last week I visited the Automotive and Diesel Program at Havre. It has 200 students, a 100% placement rate, and some graduates earn a starting salary better than a Governor. But without our investment, this program cannot grow.

And it's not just Missoula and Havre; many of our facilities are outdated and operating beyond their capacity. The young Montanans who are willing to invest in higher education deserve better. That's why [the state government]--along with the Montana Chamber of Commerce, the Montana Contractors Association and others--have joined together to propose record investments in our educational facilities.

Source: 2013 State of the State Address to Montana legislature Jan 30, 2013

Steve Bullock: Increase from 40% to 60% those with some college

Let's commit to increasing the number of Montana adults with a post-secondary degree or professional certificate to at least 60% over the next decade. We are now at about 40%; this is an ambitious goal. I have included proposals in this budget that move us in this direction.
Source: 2013 State of the State Address to Montana legislature Jan 30, 2013

Steve Bullock: MT is dead last in investment in early childhood education

Unfortunately, Montana is dead last in the nation--50th out of 50--in state investment in early childhood education. That's unacceptable.

We can't expect the federally funded Head Start program to carry the entire burden. Some local communities have stepped in to make sure these youngsters are given a better chance.

As a first step, I urge this body to expand the proven "Stars to Quality Program" and make the long overdue investment in school readiness. I've laid out a plan that will create 100 more high-quality early childhood programs, getting 600 more families and 1,000 more children ready for school, annually. It's a proven high-return investment that will produce long-lived benefits for the students and our economy. And our commitment and investment must continue throughout their schooling.

Source: 2013 State of the State Address to Montana legislature Jan 30, 2013

Amanda Curtis: No vouchers; no charters; yes Common Core

Q: Do you support the national Common Core State Standards initiative?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support a merit pay system for teachers?

A: No.

Q: Should parents be allowed to use vouchers to send their children to any school?

A: No.

Q: Do you support state funding for charter schools?

A: No.

Source: Montana Legislative Election 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Champ Edmunds: State funding for charters and vouchers

Q: Do you support a merit pay system for teachers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is the tenure process for public school teachers producing effective teachers?

A: No.

Q: Should parents be allowed to use vouchers to send their children to any school?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support state funding for charter schools?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support the state government providing college students with financial aid?

A: Yes.

Q:

Source: Montana Legislative Election 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Matt Rosendale: Supports charters and vouchers; opposes tenure

Q: Do you support the national Common Core State Standards initiative?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support a merit pay system for teachers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is the tenure process for public school teachers producing effective teachers?

A: No.

Q: Should parents be allowed to use vouchers to send their children to any school?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support state funding for charter schools?

A: Yes.

Source: Montana 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Sam Rankin: New reforms to replace No Child Left Behind

Q: Do you support requiring states to implement education reforms in order to be eligible for competitive federal grants?

A: Yes.

Rankin adds, "New reforms are more reasonable than under the old N.C.L.B requirements."

Source: Montana Election 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Bill McChesney: No state funding for charter schools

Q: Do you support national education standards?

A: No.

Q: Do you support requiring public schools to administer high school exit exams?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support using a merit pay system for teachers?

A: I'd need to see that actual proposal...there are good points and some that concern me.

Q: Do you support state funding for charter schools?

A: No.

Source: Montana State Congressional 2010 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2010

Ryan Zinke: Supports vouchers for public schools

Source: Montana Congressional 2008 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2008

Ryan Zinke: Voluntary prayer provided there's no undue influence

Q: Do you support a moment of silence in public schools?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support voluntary prayer in public schools?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support sexual education programs that include information on abstinence, contraceptives, and HIV/STD prevention methods?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support abstinence-only sexual education programs?

A: No.

Zinke adds, "I support allowing voluntary prayer on public property provided there is no undue influence to do so."

Source: Montana Congressional 2008 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2008

Mike Cooney: More funding for Head Start and critical K-12 programs